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Wesley Impact! TV: Ride for Refugees

29 September 2019 Wesley Impact! TV

In this week's episode of Wesley Impact! TV, Rev Keith Garner opens God’s word to Luke 16, where Jesus’ parable of the rich man and Lazarus in Luke 16 has an important message for all of us.

You’ll also hear from Abby Bishop, who works with Ride for Refugees, which provides Australians with the opportunity to support refugees through participating in a bike riding challenge.

Plus, we’re joined by Deb Ezzy-Walton for a beautiful rendition of The Lord is My Salvation – a wonderful reminder of just how great our Lord is!

Interview: Abby Bishop

When you look at a crowd walking along the street in any major city in Australia, it’s likely that at least a few of the people in that crowd have come to this country as refugees, fleeing violence and poverty.

The plight of refugees is what the Ride for Refugees seeks to address, by providing Australians with the opportunity to support refugees through participating in a bike riding challenge.

Abby Bishop works with Ride for Refugees, and she’s Rev Keith Garner’s guest on this week’s episode of Wesley Impact! TV.

“God has created each one of us as a human being, and we live in this world, and to have hope is part of what keeps us going as a human being. And to have that removed because of what you believe or where you were born or your social standing, what a terrible place to be in,” says Abby.

Guest performance: Deb-Ezzy Walton 

On today’s episode, Deb Ezzy-Walton and the Wesley Impact perform a beautiful rendition of The Lord is My Salvation, a remarkable reminder of the saving grace of Jesus.

Keith's message: Where do you sit?

Jesus’ parable of the rich man and Lazarus in Luke 16 has an important message for all of us.

As Rev Keith Garner explains, the way we live in this world has a fundamental effect on how we see our lives in relation to the Kingdom of God. We can always learn from the teaching of Jesus.

Tune in today and ask yourself, how do you see yourself? Where do you sit – at the table of plenty or at the gate?